Instructional Workshops

The Center holds regular e-learning, Canvas and instructional workshops as well as teaching circles, roundtables and other special events. We can also arrange a special workshop or consultation for departments, groups or individuals upon request. For details and the current schedule, please reference our calendar.

To request enrollment or individual consultation, or to a arrange a special departmental or group workshop on any of our workshop topics, please call extension 7-8080 or email ctl@uncc.edu.

How Do I: VoiceThread for Encouraging and Assessing Communication

 VoiceThread is a wonderful tool that allows students to exercise their listening and speaking skills and practice peer collaboration by creating online “conversations”. VoiceThread also has benefits for instructors, as it is a fast and easy way to give personalized audio assessment on assignments.

In this webinar, we will discuss the basics of VoiceThread for creating audio journals and assignments that integrate VoiceThread with other websites such as YouTube. If you would like more opportunities for oral communications in your courses, this is a great session for you.

Sherrie Smith, a Lecturer at the English Language Training Institute, will lead the session. She received her Master’s degree in English at UNC Charlotte. Her professional interests include literacy for English language learners and utilizing technology to increase student engagement.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

2013 Teaching with Technology Showcase

Friday, April 12, 1:00 - 3:30 PM
College of Health & Human Services, Room 376

Would you like to learn new ways to use educational technologies from your colleagues?

Please join us as three talented professors share their experiences using a variety of technologies to engage students in their courses. Students nominated 48 different faculty this year – a record number – to be honored for their work.
 

  Dale Grote:
Engaging Students in the Live Online Classroom

As more courses are offered online, professors face the challenge of teaching in a “virtual classroom.” When you teach in this environment, how do you overcome the barrier of distance and engage your students? Dr. Dale Grote, Languages and Culture Studies, uses Centra, the University’s Web conferencing system, to hold live classes. He takes advantage of tools like whiteboard, breakout rooms and chat to keep his students actively participating. Dale will share how he uses these tools and the lessons he’s learned in the live, online classroom.
 


 Caryl Gordon:
Promoting Interaction in Asynchronous Online Courses

Class discussions help students understand content and foster a sense of community. Attaining 100% participation is challenging. Caryl Gordon, American Studies, will demonstrate that using Moodle’s Forum activity encourages all students to participate in the discussion. She will also exhibit how prompt feedback for both assignments and forum posts can help students integrate your constructive criticism into their future submissions. In addition, she will share tips for wrapping up a topic, introducing new material and interacting with students.

 

 Justin Cary:
Social Media and Writing in the Higher Ed Classroom

As technology becomes more powerful, innovative and accessible, its use in the writing classroom becomes more and more important. Join Justin Cary, First-Year Writing, for a discussion about this shifting perspective. He’ll show you some very exciting and easy ways to use social media such as Facebook and Twitter, plus some visual design tools such as Infographics, Wix.com, VoiceThread and more, to help students transform essays and writings into something very special. Sometimes all it takes is a little perspective shift.



Schedule:
1:00  Welcome

1:10  Dale Grote
1:45  Caryl Gordon
2:20  Justin Cary

2:55  Panel Q&A

Light refreshments will be served. Please sign up now to attend!
 

CTL Presents: Scott Klemmer

“Teaching a Massive Open Online Class (MOOC) with Peer and Self Assessment”

Dr. Scott Klemmer is an Associate Professor at Stanford University, co-directs of the Human-Computer Interaction Group,  and holds the Bredt Faculty Scholar development chair.  He has recently taught two Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) through Coursera. The course he teaches, Human-Computer Interaction, combines design theory with practical assignments involving design of digital interfaces and applications. With tens of thousands of students, the prospect of grading students' designs would seem insurmountable. To address this issue, Dr. Klemmer has experimented with a variety of self-grading and peer-grading strategies, with mixed success, but very interesting results from a pedagogical standpoint. Dr. Klemmer will share his MOOC experiences in this presentation.

How Do I: Podcasts to Enhance Student Learning

 Podcasts are multimedia digital files that are available on the Internet for downloading to a portable media player or computer. In this webinar, we will discuss how podcasts can be used to support student learning and how to create a podcast.

Claudia Flowers, Professor of Educational Research, will lead the session. She teaches advanced statistics to graduate students in the College of Education. Her professional interests include the assessment of students with disabilities and equality and fairness issues in large-scale testing programs.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

How Do I: Moodle 2 FAQ (Webinar)

 Something old, something new … Moodle will soon be updated to Version 2. This special 30 minute Webinar will answer many of your questions. We’ll also highlight some of the new features and talk about the training and support the Center for Teaching and Learning will be offering over the next few months.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Moodle 2 Open Swim

Want to explore Moodle 2? Build your course? Try new things? The lab is open and Center for Teaching and Learning consultants will be on hand to work with you and answer your questions.

Other Moodle 2 resources:

Transitioning to Moodle 2

In this workshop, we’ll show you how to move your existing courses to Moodle 2. We’ll also look at some differences in this new version: interface changes, a new File Picker and a streamlined Assignments activity, among others.

NOTE: This workshop is for intermediate and advanced users. If you’re new to Moodle, please sign up for “Teaching with Moodle 2: The Basics.”

Other Moodle 2 resources:

Teaching with Moodle 2: The Basics

The purpose of this workshop is to orient users to the Moodle 2 environment. Participants will explore the Moodle 2 interface, create a course header, upload a syllabus and other course files, and add an activity to a course.

NOTE: This workshop is for brand new Moodle users and those who want a refresher.

Other Moodle 2 resources:

Turning Point 5 Demonstration DESCRIPTION

UNC CTL is pleased to present this demonstration of Turning Point 5 by Todd Pinney, our Turning Technologies Company Representative.  Todd will be demonstrating the new clicker software that will be used at UNC Charlotte beginning in the Fall of 2013. This demonstration is being done in conjunction with Eric Mazur's visit on Friday, February 15.

In the near future, CTL will be scheduling Turning Point 5 transition classes to ease your entry into the new software, but we are happy to unveil TP5 this week.  See you there!

How Do I: Blogs to Compliment Course Instruction

 Are you looking for a great way to encourage students to connect with your course material?

Blogs are great tools for students to practice their writing skills, for collaboration among groups of students, and for research. Blogging is also a way for students to extend what they are learning in the classroom. In this webinar, we will discuss the pros and cons of having a blog as a required course component, how this technology can enhance student learning, and ideas on how to evaluate and assess blogs in your classroom.

This is a great session for instructors who are curious to know more about blogging basics and would like to discuss ideas about how to incorporate blogging technology in their classrooms.

Meaghan Rand, Lecturer in First-Year Writing, will lead the session.  She is a Doctoral Candidate in Curriculum and Instruction—Urban Literacy at UNC Charlotte.  Her professional interests include writing pedagogy, integrating technology into classroom practices, and writing program administration.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Mazur-Active_Learning

NOTE: This workshop is limited to 30 participants and requires a signup below.  [If you are looking to to attend the Keynote Address and Luncheon, please sign up for that event separately].

Friday, February 15, 12:30 PM, CHHS 376

Dr. Mazur is a scientist, researcher, and educational innovator from Harvard University and has pioneered the “flipped classroom.”  His use of active learning technologies has revolutionized the college classroom as we know it. 

In this workshop we will explore how we can better engage students using different active learning techniques.

 

Mazur-Keynote

“Confessions of a Converted Lecturer”

Friday, February 15, 9:00 AM, CHHS 155

Dr. Mazur is a scientist, researcher, and educational innovator from Harvard University and has pioneered the “flipped classroom.”  His use of active learning technologies has revolutionized the college classroom as we know it.  Eric Mazur will share his engaging experiences and promises to light up the audience. 

Please sign up now to join us at this exciting event!  Lunch will be provided.

Schedule of Events:
9:00    Sign-in, light refreshments
9:30    Keynote Address, "Confessions of a Converted Lecturer"
10:45    Q&A
11:30    Luncheon/Roundtable Discussions
--------------------------------------------------------
12:30    Workshop/Small Group Activity on Active Learning (NOTE: requires separate signup, limited to 30 attendees)

 


 

How Do I: Google Sites for Student Collaboration

 Have you ever wanted to create a space for students to peer review each other, build community by sharing videos, and have one space where they can submit group projects? Google Apps is the perfect resource to accomplish all of these goals. Students can upload documents to Google Drive (used to be called Docs) and share them with one another to work collaboratively and can easily insert videos or pictures into a Google Site. Google Sites is a great place to create a wiki, or "quick" Website for your classes.  

This webinar will cover creating a Google Sites wiki for a class that is a space for students to upload videos they produce for class assignments, as well as projects they submit for the class. You will also see the way in which a wiki may be used as a semester writing portfolio.

Mary McKenzie, a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology, has been at UNC Charlotte since 1993. She teaches fully online courses and hybrid courses, as well as face-to-face. Her teaching passions include sociology courses in law, crime, and the internet, or our digital society.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

How Do I: Use Clickers to Reduce Paper in the Classroom

 Finding your desk buried by student work? Looking for ways to get rid of the paper piles generated by your classes? Join this month’s Webinar to learn how you can replace traditional paper-based activities with the use of clickers in order to reduce the volume of paperwork in your classroom. Instructors of all levels of clicker experience – or those just interested in how clickers may be useful – are welcome!
 

Meredith Norris, M.S., Lecturer in Biology, will lead the session. She has integrated clickers into a range of classes as part of a student-centered classroom to support active learning and collaborative group work for both non-science and science majors. Meredith’s professional interests include biology education research and she recently participated in the 2012 National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Science Education.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Showcasing Online Courses

The Center for Teaching and Learning invites all faculty to attend a showcase on three exemplary online courses designed and taught by Communication Studies faculty members listed below. Features of the 100% online courses will be presented along with student feedback and grade distribution data for a discussion of effectiveness of the online courses.


Staci Kuntzman - COMM 2107 Interpersonal Communication

Ms. Kuntzman is a lecturer and the Internship Director for the Communication Studies department. She has held this position since August 2005. She served as the Director of Forensics from 2001 to 2005. As the Internship Director, her duties include interviewing all potential interns, evaluating the performance of current interns, building and maintaining relationships with internship sponsors, and maintaining all internal communication for the Internship program to promote opportunities with internships. Specific courses taught include undergraduate courses in public speaking, advanced public speaking, interpersonal communication, and argumentation and debate.


Sandy Hanson - COMM 2105 Small Group Communication

Mrs. Hanson currently teaches undergraduate courses in Organizational Communication, Small Group Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Advance Organizational Communication, Public Speaking, and Communication and Conflict. She has held this position since July, 2000, but served as a part time employee starting in 1983. During her part time employment with UNCC, she also taught for other academic institutions including courses in Persuasion, Business Communication, Career Exploration, Becoming a Master Student, Fundamentals of Communication, and Business and Professional Communication. She currently serves UNCC through her connection with the English Language Training Institute as a guest lecturer every semester. Annually, she lectures for the Continuing Education Department a part of UNCC’s long term relationship with the EMS Management Institute. Another annual service she provides is to the Office of International Affairs as a guest lecturer for the Intensive English for Japanese Teachers program. Hanson is active in completing textbook reviews for several publishing companies, has published a chapter on conflict and communication in an introductory textbook, and has presented many papers at numerous professional organizational conferences.


Dan Grano - COMM 2101 Introduction to Rhetorical Theory

Dr. Grano teaches graduate and undergraduate courses within his interest areas, including Rhetorical Theory and Criticism, Ethics and Cultural Studies. Grano received his Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Public Address from Louisiana State University in 2003. His research focuses on how power shapes moral judgment, especially in popular cultural contexts like mediated sport. He has published in various journals within the communication studies discipline, including Critical Studies in Media Communication, Rhetoric & Public Affairs, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, and The Southern Communication Journal, and has an upcoming article (co-authored with Kenneth Zagacki) on the race and class politics of the New Orleans Superdome reopening in The Quarterly Journal of Speech. Grano actively presents research at conferences within the communication studies discipline.


 

How Do I: Moodle Grade Book and Mail Merge

Tracking students' progress and sending early alerts to those who are not keeping up is growing in importance. In this Webinar, you'll learn how to use the Moodle Grade Book and some features of Microsoft Office to quickly communicate with your students on an individual basis.

View "Using Mail Merge with the Grade Book" how-to guide

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Quizzing with Moodle 2 - old

You’ve reached the point in your instruction where it is important to assess the knowledge and/or process gains of your learners and you are looking for alternatives to Opscan fill-in-the-bubble testing.  Moodle testing and quizzes offer the opportunity for you to accomplish the following:

  • Create self-scoring quizzes and exams.
  • Control time and access for testing.
  • Create formative AND summative exams.
  • Provide accessibility features in testing.
  • Create and modify testing banks for use in test design.
  • Randomization of tests.
  • User overrides.

This workshop is aimed at the beginning Moodle user/test creator who wants to explore the features of Moodle that can be used in testing. 

Optional:  Come to the workshop with a set of 10 questions with which you will create your first test in Moodle!

Recovering from PowerPoint

Do your students get so many bullets they feel attacked by a firing squad? Do you feel responsible for highlighting in class all of the important material they should have read? In this workshop we will consider how to move from PowerPoint based lectures to using PowerPoint as a support for more interactive class sessions.

Helping Students to Manage their Time and their Academic Work

This workshop will explore possible reasons why students experience difficulties to meet deadlines and academic goals, and how instructors can help them to manage their time and assignments more effectively.

Facebook for Professional Use

Everyone knows what Facebook is, but not everyone realizes that it can have professional  uses far beyond keeping in touch with family and friends. If you attend annual conferences, you have certainly noticed that social media have found a role in the world of academic research, allowing large networks of professionals to connect and communicate.  Facebook, whether through the use of personal, organizational, fan or group pages, can be used for exactly this purpose – to establish networks of “friends” for your research, your lab, and, in fact, any research-related activities you choose. Once started, these networks can be developed to become effective tools for communicating and engaging with colleagues, students and larger public audiences.

For researchers interested in learning the basics about using Facebook professionally and in learning some simple, practical techniques for developing professional Facebook networks, this one-hour, hands-on workshop will include instruction in creating a Facebook account, a tour of Facebook settings and options in creating Facebook pages, and some basic tips and techniques for managing pages and developing  an effective network. The workshop will also include practical advice about the time commitments involved, efficient time-use strategies, the dynamics of public interaction, and a brief discussion of University policies involving official University use.

Cindy Jones is the Web Communications Manager at UNC Charlotte.  Since joining the University in 2009, she has been responsible for managing and promoting University-level social media sites, including Facebook and YouTube.  In collaboration with University Communications and the Campus Communicators, Cindy develops and administers a comprehensive social media posting schedule that includes content spanning all academic and business units as well as represents our core brand channels.  She also collaborates with her teammates to ensure that all questions and comments received via social media are addressed in a timely and accurate fashion.  Cindy has served as a consultant, sharing her experience with members of the faculty and staff through facilitating workshops related professional social media usage.

Brandon Kirkley is the Public Communications Specialist at UNC Charlotte. Since completing his MA at UNC Charlotte in 2010, Brandon has worked with the Web Communications and Marketing teams to handle the University's Facebook, Twitter and Flickr presence. He is also an adjunct lecturer with COMM and GIAS, teaching two courses dealing with new/social/digital media.

This workshop is co-hosted by Research and Economic Development & the Center for Teaching & Learning

Developing a Research Network with Twitter

 Would you be interested in an hourly news feed dedicated to research and commentary specific to your field?  In being able to follow and participate in unmoderated discussions between global communities of researchers? In getting immediate reports from peers on conferences you are unable to attend? Or in monitoring inside news from fields you would like to follow but are not actively involved in? The microblogging and social media platform Twitter, though once ridiculed as being trivial and content-free, has, in fact, rapidly evolved as the tool of choice for rapid news delivery and networked communication in many academic disciplines. Many researchers also find Twitter can be an effective and relatively effortless way to promote their own work to their larger disciplinary communities.

For researchers interested in learning the basics about Twitter and in learning some simple, practical techniques for professional Twitter use, this one-hour, hands-on workshop will include instruction in creating Twitter accounts, a tour of common features, and techniques for developing a personalized Twitter network. The workshop will also include practical advice about efficient Twitter use and minimizing time commitments, network marketing and the dynamics of public interaction.

The workshop instructor, James Hathaway, manages the office of research communication for the Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development.  A professional science writer, he has over 20 years of experience in promoting university research and has been active on Twitter for more than four years. He administers the @UNCCResearch Twitter feed, among several others.

This workshop is co-hosted by Research and Economic Development & the Center for Teaching & Learning.

Introduction to Research Blogging

 Have you considered blogging to increase visibility in your field? If you attend annual conferences, you have certainly noticed that social media have found a role in the world of academic research, allowing large networks of professionals to connect and communicate.  Blogging, the oldest of these media, is a natural medium for faculty to talk informally about their work and field, presenting new ideas for discussion with peers, and also sometimes reaching out to larger audiences.

For researchers interested in learning blog basics and curious about what is involved in blogging for professional purposes, this one-hour, hands-on workshop will include instruction in creating a blog, a tour of common features of blog sites, and techniques for audience development. Taught by an experienced UNC Charlotte faculty blogger with an established reputation in research blogging, the workshop will also include practical advice about blog development in academia, the time commitments involved, and the dynamics of public interaction.

Dr. Greg Gbur is an active researcher in optical science and an associate professor in UNC Charlotte’s Department of Physics and Optical Science. He maintains a popular science blog, Skulls in the Stars, that seeks to present science in an understandable way to the general public. He has won awards for his blogging and is a past editor of  ResearchBlogging.org, a site that aggregates and comments on blogging about scientific research. He is also the founder of a blog carnival, The Giant’s Shoulders, that focuses on the history of science.

This workshop is co-hosted by Research and Economic Development and the Center for Teaching & Learning.

Active Teaching with Technology

Learning technologies like Moodle, Mahara, Google Apps, Clickers, Saba Meeting, and SurveyShare enable instructors to incorporate student-centered, active learning components that may be too time-consuming to manage otherwise. This workshop will introduce various learning technologies CTL supports by illustrating example use of the technologies to put into practice the recommendations made by Chickering and Gamson (1987) in their article, Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education.

New Ways of Engaging Students: Google Apps

 Google Apps is a suite of communication and collaboration tools used to create documents, Web sites, and more – all in a password-protected environment using NinerNet credentials for access. In this workshop, you'll learn how to use these Apps:

  • Docs for sharing and collaborating on documents, spreadsheets, and presentations
  • Sites for shared Web sites or a course wiki

SOTL Symposium 2012

The Center for Teaching and Learning invites all faculty to attend the 2012 UNC Charlotte SoTL Project Poster event. This event will showcase the accomplishments of the UNC Charlotte faculty who have engaged in SoTL projects that have been funded with SoTL grants for the last three years.

This event will provide a great opportunity to learn from colleagues through informal poster presentations.
Lunch will be provided through a make-your-own sandwich bar and soft drinks.

Presenters:

  ■  Strengthening Students’ Research Skills through Librarian-Faculty Collaboration
      Stephanie Otis and Alison Bradley (Atkins Library)

  ■  A Study of the Effect of Instructor Feedback and Students’ Written Reflections on the Oral Communication Skills of   Electrical Engineering Students
      Jean Coco (Communicating Across the Curriculum), Mehdi Miri, Robert Cox, James Conrad, and Nan BouSaba (Electrical and Computer Engineering)

  ■  Redesigning Online Deductive Logic to Improve Retention
      Daniel R. Boisvert and Marvin J. Croy (Philosophy)

  ■  Early Engagement and Academic Success of First-Year and Transfer Students at UNC Charlotte
      Sandra Dika (Co-PI), Mark D’Amico (Co-PI), Bob Algozzine, and Ted Elling (Educational Leadership). Graduate student contributors: Donna Ginn, Dia Harden, and Elaine O’Reilly

  ■  Pedagogical Resources for Comprehensive Musicianship
     John Allemeier, Jay Grymes, and Fred Spano (Music)

  ■  Supporting the Transition and Adaptation of Academic Programs for Online Delivery: An Analytic Framework
      Meredith DiPietro (Educational Leadership)

  ■  Windows into Teaching and Learning [WiTL]
      Tina Heafner , Teresa Petty, Michelle Plaisance and Abiola Farinde (Middle, Secondary, & K-12 Education)

  ■  Scaffolding Clinical Connections (SCC): Pre-Service Theater Education Teachers in Practicum Courses
      Beth Murray (Theatre)

  ■  Improving the Impact of Learning Communities at UNC Charlotte through Research-Guided Program Development
      Kim Buch (Psychology), Cynthia Wolf Johnson (Academic Services), and Liz Fitzgerald (University College) 

  ■ Collaborative Work Within Optical Engineering: Ethnography and Curricular Development in the Proposed Undergraduate Concentration in Optical Engineering in MEES at UNC Charlotte
      Donna Lanclos (Atkins Library), Chris Evans, Matthew Davies, and Thomas Suleski (Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Sciences). Graduate Assistant: Angela Ferrara

  ■ Engaging Intelligent Dialogue on Sensitive Issues With Social Work Students
      Othelia Lee and Mary Ann Priester (Social Work)

  ■  Redesigning SPAN 1201 and SPAN 1202 as Hybrid Courses
      Concepcion Godev (Language and Culture Studies)

  ■  Use your Moodle: Creating a Reusable Plagiarism Tutorial
     Lisa Nickel, Heather McCullough, Somaly Kim Wu, and Stephanie Otis (Atkins Library)

Understanding the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Teaching diverse student populations in different disciplines at the university level is generating questions about how the subject matter interfaces with the process of teaching and learning. This workshop will address what is and what is not scholarship of teaching, what are some of the research questions that have been and are being explored, and how the findings from this scholarship are disseminated.

How Do I: Embed Video in Moodle

 Did you realize that utilizing video resources as part of the instructional process can expand student learning in the four major domains: cognitive, affective, psychomotor, & interpersonal?  Would you like to learn how to locate videos to enrich the learning process for your students?

This Webinar will cover quick search processes to locate videos and provide a demonstration of using the embed code to insert the videos directly into your Moodle course. When instructors embed videos, it provides fewer distractions for students. The Webinar content will be beneficial for instructors who use Moodle for online, blended, and/or face-to-face courses.

Mrs. Patti Wilkins, M.Ed, full-time Lecturer of Instructional Systems Technology in the College of Education, will lead the session. She is currently a Doctoral Candidate in the Educational Leadership program at UNC Charlotte. She teaches online and face-to-face courses to pre-service teachers employing a hands-on approach of integrating  technology in the classroom. Her research interests include project-based learning, integrating technology into the curriculum, and utilizing emerging Web 2.0 resources to enhance instructional practices in the learning environment. Patti also serves as a member on the Information Technology Advisory Committee (ITAC) and the Professional Education Council (PEC) for the College of Education

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

New Ways of Engaging Students: Collaboration Tools

Interactive collaboration online has come a long way in the last couple of years.  Learn how students can complete assignments and engage with course content by using Google Docs, blogs, wikis, and social media.

Tracking Student Learning

Since we now have powerful but easy to use tools that track and record students’ progress, how can we do some basic data mining to improve student learning and keep everyone on track?  Come learn about the emerging field of learning analytics and how to access and use Moodle’s Reports and Grade Book features - and more- to know how your students are doing in your class and to help them succeed.  

New Ways of Engaging Students: Desktop Video Recording

Haven’t you ever said to yourself, “I wish I could just have my students see what I’m seeing on my desktop! I wish I could just point to the information they need the most…”

Now, you can create a short video clip on your own computer that does exactly that. In this workshop you’ll learn how to use Screencast-o-Matic to record action on your screen along with your voice and record Webcam video in the Moodle Video Resource.

Please bring a 1-minute script to your session that looks at the most important thing you want your students to know. You will record this script in our workshop, and leave with a video you can link directly through Moodle!

If you already have a headset with an integrated microphone, bring this with you to the workshop.

View an example video:


 

Clone of Faculty Spotlight: 2011 Bank of America Award Finalist Series - David Thaddeus

"Learning By Doing"

A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. David Thaddeus
2011 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Friday, April 20, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Atkins Library Room 146


All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where David Thaddeus will discuss
how he requires his students to engage in active learning—or learning by doing—to learn the material best.
David Thaddeus “Professor Thaddeus is a great person to learn from. He takes a fairly boring subject such as structures and turns it into an exciting class.... He is always around to help students out and takes time to learn everyone’s name. You really feel like you matter to him…. He is the definition of an outstanding teacher.”  — a student of David Thaddeus, 2011 BOA award finalist              

About David Thaddeus
David Thaddeus is a registered architect and Professor of Structures and Architectural Design. He has been at UNCC since 1999. His research interests focus on the pedagogy of teaching structural concepts and ideas using visual and qualitative methods. In addition he is interested in exploring structures, materials and construction methods from the perspective of sustainability and performance. Thaddeus has received several awards for his teaching and service at UNCC and UH and the American Institute of Architects.

David Thaddeus

 

Webinar: Web-Based Course Evaluations DESCRIPTION

Here is an opportunity to take a look inside the Web-Based Course Evaluation system that will be introduced in CHHS, COED, and CoA.  Participants will have the opportunity to look at how the evaluation system works from the point of view of students, faculty, deans, and department chairs.  We will be exploring:

  • the UNC Charlotte Course Evaluation Portal (myevals.uncc.edu)
  • the evaluation process through the student lens
  • standard reports and new reports as an instructor, a dean, and a department chair.

This webinar will have interactive Q&A throughout the session, as well as Q&A at the close of the session.

Note: You will be sent a link to attend the webinar. You can run the Wimba Setup Wizard to test your computer before attending.

Motivating Students: The Study Guide

Students' success may depend in part on the quality of study guides. This workshop will engage participants in examining the features of helpful study guides and how they can be used to motivate students and keep them on track

Making Sense of your Web-Based Course Evaluations: ADMINISTRATORS ONLY

CTL staff will be available to address the specific needs of UNC Charlotte Department Chairs, Deans, and Administrators to access and interpret their evaluation reprots as well as to create additional reports using existing data.

Tutorials are also available at http://myevals.uncc.edu

Making Sense of your Web-Based Course Evaluations: Open Swim DESCRIPTION

CTL staff will be available to help UNC Charlotte Faculty, Department Chairs, Deans, and Administrators to access and interpret their evaluation reports as well as to create additional reports using existing data.

 

Tutorials are also available at http://myevals.uncc.edu

 

Making Sense of Your Web-Based Course Evaluation LAPTOP-Description

Description:  This hands-on session will show UNC Charlotte Faculty, Department Chairs, Deans, and Administrators the process of accessing data from their completed online course evaluations.  We will highlight (1) the standard report PDF that was delivered by email, (2) the standard report available online, and (3) additional reporting functions with evaluation data available through the online system. 

 

Tutorials are also available at http://myevals.uncc.edu/

 

Making Sense of Your Web-Based Course Evaluations Demo DESCRIPTON

Description:  This demonstration will show UNC Charlotte Faculty, Department Chairs, Deans, and Administrators the process of using the new online course evaluation system.  We will highlight (1) the standard report PDF that was delivered by email, (2) the standard report available online, and (3) additional reporting functions with evaluation data available through the online system, (4) followed by a Q&A session.

Tutorials are also available at http://myevals.uncc.edu

 

Accessibility: A Hidden iPad Treasure!

  It's not an app, it's buried in the iOS. We will explore the built in accessibility features of the iPad and discuss a few free apps as well. So bring your iPad and lets start digging for gold!

Judy Walker, Education/Psychology Reference Librarian in Atkins Library , will lead the session.


Image: “iPad,” chibiayu, Flickr (CC)

How Do I: Social Bookmarking

 Ever find yourself overburdened and unorganized with a list of important Websites? Come and get an overview of  social bookmarking - a Web 2.0 tool that can help you organize Websites and network with other people around the world.

Dr. Drew Polly, Assistant Professor, Reading and Elementary Education, will lead the session. His professional interests include supporting learner-centered instruction in classrooms, supporting technology integration, and supporting standards-based mathematics teaching. Drew also serves as the Co-Director of the UNC Charlotte Professional Development School Network, and the Program Coordinator of the Graduate Certificate in Elementary School Mathematics.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Centra Part II: Presenting with Centra

Centra is our live, virtual classroom and meeting environment available to faculty and staff members. In this workshop, you will learn how to design, present and record class and meeting sessions.

Workshop Prerequisites: This workshop is part II of II. We strongly recommend that you attend the "Centra Part I: Online Introduction" workshop first, especially if you have never participated in a live Webinar.

NOTE: Please bring a PowerPoint presentation, a Web site URL, a Web-ready image file and any other file type you might use in a class.

Centra Part I: Online Introduction

 Experience the collaborative features of this live, highly interactive virtual classroom and meeting environment in a one-hour, online demonstration. In Centra you can present and discuss learning materials using robust features that include two-way audio, video, content display, interactive whiteboard, application sharing, surveys and breakout rooms for small group discussion.

Workshop Prerequisites: None. This workshop is part I of II.  We recommend that you to attend this session before the "Centra Part II: Presenting with Centra" workshop, especially if you have never participated in a live Webinar.

NOTE: This is an online workshop. You will need access to the Internet and a microphone to participate fully. Please run the System Check to verify that your computer can run Centra. You will be sent a link the day before the workshop.

Faculty Spotlight: 2011 Bank of America Award Finalist Series - Gregg Starrett

"Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses"

A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Gregg Starrett
2011 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Friday, March 16, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Atkins Library Room 146


All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Gregory Starrett will lead a discussion of Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa's recent book, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (2011).  This book created quite a buzz in higher education when it was published last January, so this session promises to be an interesting and challenging discussion.
 
"I became an anthropologist and a teacher because this kind of learning is a vital part of self-discovery and of efforts for social change.”  —Gregory Starrett, 2011 BOA award finalist
 

About Gregory Starrett

A professor of Anthropology, Starrett believes that the classroom is not primarily about transmitting information but about highlighting questions, approaches and ways of seeing the world. Starrett’s areas of research in Islamic political movements, public and material culture and the role of educational institutions in transmitting the Islamic religious heritage in the Middle East and the United States have brought him many opportunities to teach in the public domain. He believes the social (or human) sciences provide opportunities to articulate, analyze and critique experiences in ways that are otherwise impossible.

 


Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series

  • April 20: David Thaddeus (COAA)

 

2012 Teaching with Technology Showcase

Friday, March 23, 1:00 - 3:00 PM
College of Health & Human Services, Room 380

Would you like to learn new ways to use educational technologies from your colleagues?

Please join us as three talented professors share their experiences using a variety of technologies to engage students in their courses. This year's presenters were selected from nominations submitted by students.
 

 Coral Wayland:
Using Google Docs and Skype to Teach Students a New Way to Think

Coral Wayland, Department of Anthropology, uses Google Docs and Skype to successfully promote collaboration and mentoring among her students, help them assimilate complicated ideas using concept mapping, and broaden their view. In the words of one of her former students: “We learned how to use technology as a tool to learn, express ourselves, understand what we were reading at a deeper level, and to communicate with the very authors of our texts. Inspiring!”
 


 John Taylor:
Developing Multimedia Presentations with the Classroom Podium

In this presentation, John Taylor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, will show how he uses the podium document camera and Panopto’s screen classroom capture software to record live presentations in front of his class in a web-based format that can be reviewed later by the students at home through Moodle. Students can navigate throughout these videos by streaming the multimedia presentations to review course information at their own pace.
 

 

 Meredith Norris:
Counting on Clickers:  Ways to Engage Students and Promote Active Learning

Clickers can engage students in the classroom and provide you, as the instructor, with a flexible tool to increase participation, assess students, and receive feedback. Meredith Norris, Department of Biology, will present an overview on the use of clickers in the classroom and the management of the technology. She will share examples of using clickers beyond simply taking attendance but also to support and integrate active learning. You will leave with ideas on how to implement clickers in a way that will support your teaching goals and benefit your students.


Schedule
1:00  Coral Wayland
1:40  John Taylor
2:20  Meredith Norris

Light refreshments will be served. Please sign up now to attend!
 

Clicker Open Swim

This is the perfect opportunity to get your Clicker questions addressed by the CTL.  At this workshop session, you can ask about challenges that you are experiencing with anything in the Turning Technologies Clicker suite, including

  • TurningPoint2008
  • Turning Point Anywhere
  • Turning Key (the testing software that replaces Opscan/bubble sheets)
  • Results Manager
  • Exporting grades from Turning products into Moodle

 

We will have clickers available for demonstration of any of the products that are available and experts on hand to answer your questions.

Teaching Large or Small Classes Open Swim

Would you like to brainstorm about improving course evaluations, keeping students on task,  overcoming stage fright, or any other question? Bring your questions. A CTL faculty fellow will be available to assist you.

Large Course Redesign RFP Q&A Session

This 30-minute open session is designed to answer any questions you may have about the RFP process or the redesign process itself.  (It is not required for grant seekers to attend: it is only provided to assist in the process, if needed.)

Google Apps at UNC Charlotte

Google Apps for Education is a collection of applications from Google to facilitate collaboration and communication between instructors and their students. In this workshop, we will discuss how you can use these applications to enhance teaching and learning experiences and create communities for increased participation and greater student engagement.

How Do I: Microlectures

The History of Rome in 90 seconds?  How about quantum mechanics; physics; concepts of calculus; Hamlet’s angst delivered in a minute?  David Penrose, the founding father of microlectures at San Juan College in New Mexico argues such tiny bursts of educational knowledge can be delivered succinctly and effectively within a 60-90 second window.

Dr. Kurt Richter and Tom Cook will share the concepts behind the microlecture and how they have been used at UNC Charlotte during the past year.  Additionally, you will have the opportunity to see several microlectures that have been delivered using this process already.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

"I Misunderstood the Assignment": Bridging Instructional Gaps in Undergraduate and Graduate Classes.

Students' ability to carry out in-class and out-of-class assignments begin with understanding instructions. This workshop will engage participants in the discovery of how instructions can be formulated and delivered to assist students with completing assignments and meeting their deadlines.

Teaching with Clickers

Need a tool that will increase class interactivity?  Gather feedback on what your students are really thinking in class?  Encourage shy students to let their opinions be known?  UNC Charlotte is using clickers to accomplish all of these teaching strategies and more.  This workshop will cover the basic information that you need to know to get started with clickers, including how to use them, how to gather data, and how to upload data into Canvas.

This workshop teaches how to us Turning Point Cloud, the latest updated version of clickers. Participants will experience what it is like to be a student in a clicker-enabled classroom as we ask questions about a number of topics.  Bring your own laptop if you want assistance loading the Turning Technologies Instructor software. Come join us for an interactive clicker experience!