Instructional Workshops

The Center holds regular e-learning, Canvas and instructional workshops as well as teaching circles, roundtables and other special events. We can also arrange a special workshop or consultation for departments, groups or individuals upon request. For details and the current schedule, please reference our calendar.

To request enrollment or individual consultation, or to a arrange a special departmental or group workshop on any of our workshop topics, please call extension 7-8080 or email ctl@uncc.edu.

Engaging Students with Web 2.0 Technologies (Online)

In this session, attendees will examine how popular instructional technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social software can enhance interaction between instructor, students, and course content - thereby increasing active participation, enhancing communication and collaboration, providing opportunities for active feedback, and making learning more engaging.

NOTE: This is a new online-only version of the workshop using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet (and a microphone if you want to speak during the session). See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Using Video in Your Course (Online)

Everywhere you look on the Internet these days, you can find video. So, it's no wonder that more and more faculty are looking into using video in their courses. In this workshop, we'll discuss why to use video and explore your options – whether you want to use existing videos or create your own.

NOTE: This is a new online-only version of the workshop using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet (and a microphone if you want to speak during the session). See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Understanding and Managing Academic Plagiarism

Plagiarism has become a more obvious violation of academic integrity since the Internet. It is both easier to accomplish and easier to detect; it is also easier to argue against it. Learn how you can help reduce plagiarism in student work.

Designing and Grading Writing Assignments

Students often do not understand the relationship between the design and objectives of a writing assignment and the criteria used to grade it. This workshop will help teachers write project goals for students and create an assessment tool to show students whether they have accomplished those goals.

Planning for Next Semester: Not Making the Same Mistakes Twice

This is a good time in the semester to reflect on what we have done, what seemed to work, and what we know we could do better. This workshop will provide an opportunity to ask some questions that will help you become a more “critically reflective teacher.”

How Do I: Using Moodle's Video Resource (Webinar)

You can now easily add video files directly to your Moodle course. Students will view the videos in a media player – just like watching a YouTube video. In this Webinar, you'll learn how to upload, convert and link to videos. We'll also discuss best practices for using the tool.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Designing and Facilitating Student Project Groups: Collaborative Writing

Students learn well when they work in small groups: they learn to collaborate, to handle conflict, to communicate, and to reach consensus.  This workshop will discuss ways to set up collaborative writing groups so your students can work successfully in groups to plan, write, and revise a document. We will discuss what kinds of writing projects are appropriate for group work and ways to assess the group’s performance.

Summative Assessment: Developing Essay Tests

Essay tests are excellent for measuring higher level thinking such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Writing clear essay questions that students understand and can respond to is a skill that must be developed.   This workshop will take you through a process for determining when essay questions are appropriate as an assessment. A process for developing clear essay questions will be presented.

 

Summative Assessment: Developing Objective Tests

Objective tests are widely used to assess student learning. While objective test items are useful for assessing the lower levels of knowledge, some types can be effective for measuring more complex learning outcomes. The objectives of the workshop are: to identify when objective test items are appropriate for measuring student learning and to develop skills for development of effective objective tests.

 

Designing and Facilitating Student Project Groups

Students learn well when they work in small groups: they learn to collaborate, to handle conflict, to communicate, and to reach consensus. In this workshop, you will learn some theories of how to set up student groups in your classes, how to design appropriate group projects, and how to evaluate both the project and the group process.

Fundamentals of College Teaching

Graduate Assistant Workshop

Most students enter graduate programs expecting to learn and change; some, however, do not realize that part of their learning will include teaching courses and labs for undergraduates both in their major and in general education courses.

So, when you (as a graduate student) are asked to teach or to take on some teaching responsibilities, you may have few strategies to help you succeed.

This workshop introduces you to basic teaching strategies: what pedagogies are available to you, what technologies can help you, what kinds of students will you have in your classroom, and how you can deal with matters of classroom discipline or civility. You will earn one hour of graduate credit for successfully completing this workshop.
The sessions will meet from 1:00-3:00 on these Friday afternoons:

  • February 11
  • February 18
  • February 25
  • March 18
  • March 25

In the past, the workshops have attracted students from many disciplines with a range of teaching experiences.

The workshops are co-facilitated by Dr. Meg Morgan from the Department of English and an affiliate with the Center for Teaching and Learning and Dr. Maria Yon from the College of Education, a faculty fellow for five years with the Center for Teaching and Learning. Together they have 80 years of teaching experience.

NOTE: This is also offered as a one-credit-hour course. If you would like to sign-up for this as a credit bearing course, through the normal course registration system, instead of a workshop, the course is  EDUC-6000-001. Or you may sign-up here for the non-credit version. So we have a proper count of attendees, please sign-up here or there, but NOT both.

Teaching with Moodle: The Basics (Online)

The purpose of this workshop is to orient users to the Moodle environment. Users will explore the Moodle interface, create headers and summaries, upload a course syllabus and course files, and modify their user profiles. Workshop Prerequisites: None.

NOTE: This is a new online-only version of the workshop using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet (and a microphone if you want to speak during the session). See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Active Teaching with Moodle

A part of the Moodle Course Design workshop series, this workshop presents how to use Moodle to incorporate active teaching techniques into the class. Hear about how the use of Lesson, Video, Group, Grouping, Quiz, Feedback, etc. can facilitate student engagement and participation.

 

Class Management with Moodle

A part of the Moodle Course Design workshop series, this workshop presents how to use Moodle to manage class easily and quickly. Hear about the kinds of Moodle features you can use to handle typical class management tasks such as orienting and knowing students, taking attendance, handling student inquiries, class materials, and grades, etc.

 

Teaching Large Classes: Creating a Positive Classroom Environment

Large classes present particular issues and challenges.  These challenges can be minimized by setting up an environment where students feel safe and valued.  This workshop will focus on best practices for getting your students engaged in learning in an setting that can be daunting to both you and your students.

Next Steps in Large Course Redesign (Session for Redesign Grant Recipients)

This is a general meeting for all of the recipients of the Large Course Redesign Grant funding. We will discuss criteria for Round II proposals and general considerations necessary to achieve improvements in teaching and learning through the course redesign efforts. We will also discuss our plans for how CTL will facilitate course redesign planning efforts throughout the summer.

EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative: Blended Learning: The 21st-Century Learning Environment

Sessions will be held 12:00 PM to 5:30 PM on Wednesday, September 15, and from 12:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 16.

The goal of this EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) 2010 Online Fall Focus Session is to revisit the potential of blended learning instructional models, student learning outcomes, and successful implementation practices. The maturing of online learning practices and engagements has opened new possibilities for curriculum design, including both face-to-face and online learning opportunities. The ability to design a course that uniquely blends face-to-face and distributed interaction allows institutions to address learners’ specific needs and customize the learning environment rather than rely on a “one size fits all” approach.

During this two-day online event we will:

  • Revisit the status of blended learning today—what we’ve learned and how this instructional approach continues to evolve to support learning across many disciplines
  • Create a framework for the successful design and deployment of faculty development for blended learning
  • Explore successful implementations of blended learning across different types of institutions
  • Reflect on the potential for blended learning to promote critical thinking, student engagement, and success
  • Consider assessment strategies for blended learning, both at the course and program levels
  • Identify the role learning technologies—synchronous and asynchronous—can play in blended learning
  • Engage in dialogue with a community of professionals focused on how to design and deploy blended learning across the curriculum

Sessions will include interactions in an online seminar, Q&A with the presenters, and scenario-based discussion groups face-to-face here at UNC Charlotte.

 

Moodle Course Design

The purpose of this workshop is to provide guidelines on how to design Moodle courses. We will discuss visual design elements such as layout and themes. We will also discuss Moodle features that can help instructors to facilitate active learning and manage courses effectively.

What Is It Like to Teach in America? (Part II)

Based on positive feedback from the participants of the first brownbag session, we are glad to extend the session into Part II. This time, Dr. Charles Hutchison from College of Education, the author of Teaching in America: A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers and Their Employers, will facilitate the discussion on the approaches to resolve or alleviate issues international faculty members encounter as a professional community at UNC Charlotte.  To learn about Dr. Hutchison, view his website, http://education.uncc.edu/chutchis/.

Making Sense of Course Evaluations

Each semester faculty members are required to have students complete course evaluations. How useful they are depends on how we use them. What can these evaluations tell us about our teaching? How can the evaluations help us improve? How can we use them as evidence for reappointment or tenure and promotion? This workshop will help answer those questions.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 1: Best Practices

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 1, Best Practices for Online Course Design, we will examine best practices of online teaching identified in the literature. There are separate registrations for each of the five workshops in the series. Please feel free to register for any or all workshops in the series. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation.

Invitation to the Participants of the 2009 Summer Institute on Large Lecture Classes

This brown bag session is intended to talk about how things are going with your teaching since you participated in the Summer Institute. Has your teaching changed in any way? Have your students changed in any way? Do you have any questions or recommendations regarding large classes? Take a moment to share your current status and converse with fellow faculty members.

What Is It Like to Teach in America?

This brownbag session is intended to discuss what it is like to teach in American universities. Take a moment to begin sharing your experiences and voice your professional development needs.

Dr. Charles Hutchison in College of Education, the author of Teaching in America: A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers and Their Employers, will give his insights on what it is like to teach in America as opening remarks. To learn about Dr. Hutchison, view his website, http://education.uncc.edu/chutchis/.

 

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Jim Lyons)

Problem Based Learning to Promote Critical Thinking,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Jim Lyons,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., March 26, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive roundtable session, where Jim Lyons will discuss how to use problem based learning in the classroom to engage students and to promote critical thinking.

“The educational experience is so much more than teaching. It’s about inspiring people to learn and is as much about my education as it is about the students’ education.”—Jim Lyons, 2009 BOA Award finalist

About Jim Lyons

During his 30 year career in educational leadership at UNC Charlotte, Lyons has taught more than different 15 courses, and he has contributed significantly to student scholarship, directing 26 doctoral dissertations (at UNC Charlotte and UNC Chapel Hill) and serving as an advisor for more than 125 master’s degree projects. His past students include 12 superintendents, 24 assistant superintendents, more than 600 school principals and five university faculty members. Beyond the classroom, he has offered professional development programs across the country, published extensive research and conducted a major study to inform large, urban districts on hiring of principals.

Problem-Based Learning presentation slides:

 

Using Video in Your Course

Everywhere you look on the Internet these days, you can find video. So, it's no wonder that more and more faculty are looking into using video in their courses. In this workshop, we'll discuss why to use video and explore your options – whether you want to use existing videos or create your own.

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Lori Van Wallendael)

A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Lori Van Wallendael,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., Feb. 26, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Lori Van Wallendael will discuss how we can make lectures exciting and engaging for all students. Classroom demonstrations are a hallmark of her courses, and she uses her background in theater to enhance her presentations. Her students and peers remark on how she keeps students actively engaged with many participatory classroom activities.

LoriOne student explained, "As we learned of all of the social, cultural, educational, familial, and historical forces which shaped psychology, we began to understand more about the world today and subjects such as biology, physics, and chemistry as well as literature and art. Dr. Van Wallendael took psychology beyond the walls of the classroom and far beyond our field. Our studies were truly multidisciplinary." 

About Lori Van Wallendael

Joining UNC Charlotte over 20 years ago, Lori Van Wallendael has undertaken an increasing number of responsibilities, from being the former director of the Women’s Studies Program to her current role as associate chair of the Psychology Department. She also leads the department honors program and has served as advisor to the Psychology Club and Psi Chi, the psychology honor society. Her scholarship and service also reflect her passion for teaching, as she has published instructional materials as well as articles on pedagogy.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

Faculty Spotlight: Engaging Students in the Classroom (Roundtable Hosted by Dr. Patrick Moyer)

Inspiring Students to Think Critically,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Patrick Moyer,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., Jan. 29, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Patrick Moyer will discuss how we can use students’ interests to generate critical thinking and deep learning.  Moyer will also address the important issue of how to assess critical thinking development, even in large classes, and he will discuss how our own passion for our content area leads to better student engagement.

photo

“The educational experience is so much more than teaching. It’s about inspiring people to learn and is as much about my education as it is about the students’ education.” – Patrick Moyer, 2009 BOA award finalist

About Patrick Moyer

A 14-year veteran of the Department of Physics & Optical Science, Patrick Moyer was one of the prestigious finalists for the 2009 recipient of the highest teaching honor bestowed by UNC Charlotte – the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence. Moyer developed a new general education course, “Sports and Physics,” which he teaches every semester to large classes. The course presents fundamental physics concepts as they apply to sports, with a heavy emphasis on critical thinking. He never tires of teaching the course, as each semester is excitingly different because of the students.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • February: Lori Van Wallendael (CLAS) - Effective Lecturing Techniques
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series

Engaging Students in the Classroom,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Charlie Burnap,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Winner

Fri., Nov. 20, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive roundtable session, where Charlie Burnap will discuss topics ranging from high level goals down to the nitty-gritty of teaching and how we can encourage students to be active learners.

“While setting high standards is important, it is essential to realize that most courses include students with a wide range of backgrounds, interests, and talents. Consequently, it is important that high level goals be approached in small steps. Because mastery comes from the act of doing, students must be engaged in classroom activities and must attempt assigned work.”—Charlie Burnap, 2009 BOA award winner

About Charlie Burnap

A 27-year veteran of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at UNC Charlotte, Charlie Burnap was selected from a prestigious list of finalists as the 2009 recipient of the highest teaching honor bestowed by UNC Charlotte – the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence. In addition to classroom teaching and individual tutorials, Charlie has led teaching discussions in his Department and in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. He has served on panels for Summer Institutes and on the College Task Force on the Evaluation of Teaching. He was one of the original members of the American Association of Higher Education Peer Review Project and has chaired the CLAS Course and Curriculum Committee.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • January: Patrick Moyer (CLAS) – Critical Thinking
  • February: Lori Van Wallendael (CLAS) - Effective Lecturing Techniques
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

How to Continue Instruction When Everyone’s Got the Flu

There has been much talk these days about the H1N1 flu and the possibility of a disruption of the academic year. Have you thought about how you will continue teaching if you and your students cannot come to campus?

The Center for Teaching and Learning has posted a plan for instructional continuity in the event of an emergency or disaster that might close the University for an extended period of time. In this session, you will learn more about the continuity plan and how you can prepare yourself and your students for a disruption of instruction.

NOTE: This event is an online Webinar. You can attend from anywhere you have an Internet connection and a computer with speakers. A microphone is optional.

Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is an important element in all professional fields and academic disciplines. We often say to our students, "Think!" But what do we mean by thinking and how do we encourage it? The purpose of this workshop is to introduce you to the various types of critical thinking and demonstrate how to plan for it.

New Faculty Collaborative Forum/Pizza Party

New faculty are invited to join the Center for Teaching and Learning staff to ask questions and get to know each other as we have pizza together at the end of this busy week.  Food and drink will be provided by the Center.  Just bring your questions and your collaborative spirit.  (As with all our workshops, you must signup online to attend.)

Classroom Management for Graduate Teaching Assistants

To remove some of the mystery in your new role as a graduate teaching assistant, we have pulled together all kinds of useful and foundational information on various teaching topics, from planning what you are going to teach to how to deal with problem students to how to write on the board.  This session will include a panel of your peers and will revolve around your most pressing needs, so be prepared to participate.

Teaching Large Classes

Entry-level large classes have distinctive characteristics different from those of advanced-level small classes, and it can be challenging to teach large classes.  To ensure that students receive a high quality learning experience and you remain sane at the same time, this workshop will equip you with teaching techniques and tools to overcome challenges of large classes and engage students in learning activities.

Intensive Week: Quizzing With Moodle

Time to put all the good stuff you learned about assessment during this morning’s workshops into Moodle. We will go highlight the assessment tools and features in Moodle, such as quizzing, testing, polling, and more.

Summative Assessment Approaches: Planning Ahead.

Summative assessment is a hugely important part of the teaching and learning process. Essay and objective tests, portfolios, papers, projects, performances…so much to choose from! This workshop will show you best practices for choosing various summative assessments and how they align with your course goals.

Moodle Open Swim

Want to explore Moodle? Build your course? Try new things? The lab is open and Center for Teaching and Learning consultants will be on hand to work with you and answer your questions.

Moodle 2 for New Faculty

The purpose of this workshop is to orient new faculty to the Moodle 2  learning management system. Users will explore the Moodle 2 interface, create headers and summaries, upload the course syllabus and course files, and modify their user profiles.

IT Access @ UNCC

This session will help guide you through the computing resources available to you at UNC Charlotte. Special attention will be paid to show how to access these resources from home, too, such as email, stored files, special applications, library resources, HR information, and more.

Teaching with Moodle: The Basics

The purpose of this workshop is to orient users to the Moodle environment. Users will explore the Moodle interface, create headers and summaries, upload the course syllabus and course files, and modify their user profiles. Workshop Prerequisites: None.

Course Evaluations: Getting Valuable Feedback

The end of course evaluations can be effective for some things, but perhaps you want to get more out of them.  Come learn how to go beyond the standard, required ones to design your own evaluations to get the feedback you want--and learn how to apply the feedback to your course for next time.

Last Day of Class

The last day of class is as important as most other class sessions of the semester. It is the day to highlight what students have learned, bring meaning to the experience, and celebrate their achievements.

Classroom Discussions: Fostering Social Learning

Classroom discussion can be one of the most rewarding teaching methods, since it can create a democratic learning environment, foster mutual respect, and increase learning. This seminar will equip you with strategies for immediate use in your classroom.

The New American Lecture: Active Lecturing

Lecturing is a useful instructional method, so would you like to learn how to make it even better? This practical and timely session will show you how to enhance student learning by equipping you with best practices in lecture techniques and will help you liven up your lectures.

Syllabus 101: Designing Your Course Syllabus for Maximum Effectiveness

Your course syllabus is one of the most important documents you create for your class. It serves as an agreement between you and your students about your goals for the course and your expectations for your students, plus it conveys a first--and lasting--impression with your students. This session will provide information about the important components of a syllabus, ways in which you can enhance your course syllabus, and strategies for using your syllabus as a learning tool.

First Day of Class: Starting Off on the Right Foot

The first day of class sets the tone for the entire semester. Come learn what strategies will help you start off right...and which things you must avoid, too! These simple techniques should help you be more effective and make your teaching more enjoyable.

Book Discussion Group: Five Minds for the Future

/Harvard professor Howard Gardner states that we live in a vast time of change that calls for new ways of learning and thinking in school, business, and the professions. In Five Minds for the Future, he defines the cognitive abilities that are needed to equip people for what they need to deal with in the future. Join us to examine the work of Dr. Gardner and discuss how it applies to our work at the university as we prepare students for the 21st century.

If you cannot attend an in-person discussion session, please join our online discussion, already in progress.

 

 

Creating a Podcast

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the basics of podcasting: recording, editing, uploading, and creating the subscription feed. The class will use a free audio recording and editing program. Please bring a one minute script to record (e.g. a description of an assignment), and a microphone if you have one.

Introductory Digital Video

This workshop is an introduction to the use of video, including strategies for creating content, transferring images from videotape to computer (analog to digital) and using specialized hardware and software.

Introductory Digital Audio

Provides an introductory overview of the steps that are involved in creating and incorporating sounds from a variety of sources into web courses and presentations. These sources may include voice narration, sound files from CDs and downloadable MP3s.

Discover Multimedia

Provides an overview of the various ways that multimedia can be used to enhance web courses and presentations with sounds, images and video. The basic format of the workshop will be demonstrations and discussion of the uses of various imaging, audio, video, animation, and presentation tools.