Instructional Workshops

The Center holds regular e-learning, Canvas and instructional workshops as well as teaching circles, roundtables and other special events. We can also arrange a special workshop or consultation for departments, groups or individuals upon request. For details and the current schedule, please reference our calendar.

To request enrollment or individual consultation, or to a arrange a special departmental or group workshop on any of our workshop topics, please call extension 7-8080 or email ctl@uncc.edu.

10 Things Successful Instructors Do

In this interactive session, learn the 10 essential and easy to implement foundational strategies that are used by all successful instructors.

Teaching in English

On top of the difficulties that already exist in teaching, teaching in the English language presents another layer of challenges for international faculty members. Besides proficiency, the differences in discourse style and expression may inhibit clear communication with American students. This session is intended to share “communication episodes” in teaching situations and discuss strategies to cope with them – whether through teaching and communication strategies or humor! Dr. Aixi Zhou (Dept. of Engineering Technology) will facilitate the discussion sharing his experiences including the ESL Clinic.

We will hold this informal talk at the Main Street Market in Cone Center. Please come to the windowed area facing the Center for Graduate Life.

All faculty members in addition to international faculty members are invited. For additional information on CTL's international faculty support services, please visit International Faculty Support page.

Faculty Spotlight: 2010 Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Dr. Jeanneine Jones)

Inspiring Student Excellence Through Rigor
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Jeanneine Jones
2010 BOA Teaching Award Finalist
Friday, April 29, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 273


All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Jeanneine Jones will discuss how she uses academic rigor—requiring a serious level of knowledge, application, and reflection—to inspire students to excel.

Photo of Jeanneine Jones in Action

“I strive to respect, motivate, inspire and prepare students… I expect the very best of my students and am willing to do whatever I must to get it. That’s my job. That’s my joy.” —Jeanneine Jones, 2010 BOA award finalist

About Jeanneine Jones

Photo of Jeanneine JonesAn 18-year veteran of the department of Middle, Secondary, and K-12 Education at UNC Charlotte, Jeanneine Jones has taught at the undergraduate and graduate level and has also been an assigned advisor and clinical supervisor. She never quits mentoring any student she has had, and her never-ending support is felt throughout the middle grades program.

 

Faculty Spotlight: 2010 Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Dr. Janos Gergely)

Teaching for the Real World
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Janos Gergely
2010 BOA Teaching Award Finalist
Friday, March 25, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 273
 

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Janos Gergely will share how he emphasizes the real world effects of what is being studied and his desire for students to be honest and competent in all aspects of life.

Photo of Janos Gergely in Action

“I love being among students and helping them to better appreciate their chosen field, with all of its challenges and rewards. It is always a great pleasure to observe students grow professionally, but more importantly, as decent human beings.”—Janos Gergely, 2010 BOA award finalist

About Janos Gergely

Photo of Janos GergelySince coming to the Civil and Environmental Engineering department in 1998, Janos Gergely has worked tirelessly to connect his students with the broader world. He has directed the Summer Design Studio for engineering and architectural students in Spain, and he took his Infrastructure Systems class to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to see the actual location of their class projects. He is known for providing students opportunities for community service. Locally, a masonry design class repaired a retaining wall for a non-profit, and he has taken students on his summer work trips to the Dominican Republic.
 

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series

 

Technology Showcase

Would you like to enhance your teaching with more educational technologies?

Please join us for a special Technology Showcase Friday, March 18, 2011, from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM in College of Health and Human Services (CHHS 281). Three talented instructors will share their experiences using a variety of technologies to engage students in their courses.

Diana Rowan:
Using Video within Moodle to Connect Classrooms around Global Experiences: The 6 Continents Project

With the goal of increasing social work students’ worldview and awareness of how the profession operates in other countries, 6 social work classrooms on 6 continents are participating in a year-long educational project. Using Flipcams, students make videos of their responses to prompting questions each month that are uploaded to the project’s Moodle site.


Melody Dixon-Brown:
Leveraging Online Collaboration Tools to Enhance Group Projects

While completing group projects, students gain experience in teamwork, sharing responsibility, and managing dependent tasks. This presentation will explore how students use Web-based tools such as Google Docs and Basecamp in group projects to manage revisions from multiple authors and keep project timelines on track.



Richard Hartshorne:
Unlocking the iPad – Exploring the Role of Tablet Computing in Teaching & Learning

In this presentation, we will examine the increasing role of tablet computing, particularly the iPad, in higher education courses. Topics of focus will include: 1) functionality of the iPad, 2) benefits and constraints of the iPad in teaching and learning, 3) the use of "apps" in teaching and learning, 4) issues to consider when integrating the iPad into courses, and 5) the future of tablet-based computing in higher education.

Schedule
1:00 Diana Rowan
1:40 Melody Dixon-Brown
2:20 Richard Hartshorne

Please sign up now to attend! Light refreshments will be served.

How Do I: Making Accessible PDFs

PDF files are one of the most common document formats on the Web. They enable the author of a document to maintain the integrity of that document across different platforms and ensure that the end user will see the information in exactly the same way as the author intended.

PDF files are frequently seen on Websites, uploaded to Moodle, and emailed as attachments.  However, not all PDF files can be used effectively by their intended audiences. Many students with disabilities are unable to access the information in a PDF because of a lack of accessibility. This online workshop will discuss the techniques to ensure that PDF files you create are accessible for all of your students.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

How Do I: What Faculty Need to Know About Copyright and Why (Webinar)

Today's faculty, research associates and graduate students, as creators and users of intellectual property, must develop a basic understanding and awareness of copyright law, particularly as it intersects with their educational endeavors. This session will present a brief overview of copyright law, including the fair use doctrine and its application to the online world, focusing on implications for displays and performances of copyrighted works in courses online.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching & Learning and Atkins Library.

Let’s Talk Teaching Brown Bag

Join your colleagues in an open discussion about teaching and learning facilitated by Drs. Meg Morgan and Maria Yon. The topics, selected by the participants, can be broad or specific to your particular situation. Come to share. Come to learn.

 

Faculty Spotlight: 2010 Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Dr. Matthew Davies)

Listening to Students,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Matthew Davies
2010 BOA Teaching Award Finalist
Friday, February 25, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 273

 

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Matthew Davies will discuss how he created a small group of students in each course to provides real-time feedback from the class about what is working, what is not working, and how the class can be improved. This system has even led to adopting a new textbook.

Photo of Matthew Davies in Action“My teaching goal is to provide students with a classroom environment that maximizes learning, while promoting self-confidence and ethics in the practice of engineering and research. My approach, while aimed at the expansion of knowledge, technical capability and understanding of mechanical engineering principles, is learner-centered; it encourages feedback between teacher and student.”—Matthew Davies, 2010 BOA award finalist

About Matthew Davies
Photo of Matthew DaviesAn associate professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science, Matthew Davies will mark 10 years at UNC Charlotte this year. He earned his Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1993. 

 

 

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
• March 25: Janos Gergely (COE) – Teaching for the Real World
• April 29: Jeanneine Jones (COED) – Inspiring Student Excellence
 

Facilitating and Managing Interaction Online (Webinar)

More faculty are being called upon to teach online courses or supplement a regular classroom with online elements. Online teaching and learning use strategies that differ from traditional face-to-face pedagogy. How you interact with your students is one of the most important aspects of an online course.

Please join Susan Ko in this live online session, Facilitating and Managing Interaction Online. Dr. Ko is co-author of Teaching Online: A Practical Guide and Executive Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at University of Maryland University College.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet, computer speakers, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Faculty Spotlight: 2010 Bank of America Award Finalist Series

Interactive Learning,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Jeffrey Price
2010 BOA Teaching Award Winner
Friday, November 19, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Cone 268 (Center for Graduate Life)


All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Jeffrey Price will discuss how his teaching philosophy and activities are rooted in a love and pursuit to help others attain knowledge, successfully apply information, and experience wholeness.

Jeff Price in Action“I adopt my students in such a way that, when I am with them, they are the most important thing in the world to me at that particular point in time. I do not teach music; I do not teach voices; I teach people.”—Jeffrey Price, 2010 BOA award winner

About Jeffrey Price
Jeff PriceAn 18-year veteran of the Department of Music at UNC Charlotte, Jeffrey Price was selected from a prestigious list of finalists as the 2010 recipient of the highest teaching honor bestowed by UNC Charlotte, the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence. After completing bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UNC Greensboro, he earned a doctorate from Florida State University and then served on the faculty of Marshall University.

 

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series

January: Matthew Davies (COE) – Listening To Students

February: Beth Whitaker (CLAS) – Engaging Students

March: Janos Gergely (COE) – Teaching for the Real World

April: Jeanneine Jones (COED) – Inspiring Student Excellence

 

Need Better Classroom Communication? Try International English.

The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in collaboration with English Language Training Institute (ELTI) cordially invites international faculty members and teaching assistants to attend this brownbag session.

Meriam Brown of ELTI works to enhance English proficiency of international faculty and teaching assistants at UNC Charlotte. Join her and other colleagues in a discussion about the features and advantages of using International English, along with some other simple language strategies that can make a difference in classroom communication.

This brownbag session is a component of the international faculty development services that CTL has prepared with the support of the Chancellor’s Diversity Challenge Fund. We hope that all international faculty members and teaching assistants will take a full advantage of these services.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 5: Synchronous Learning

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 5, Synchronous Online Components, we will reflect on the various components addressed during the previous weeks and discuss the workshop’s effectiveness. Participants will have the opportunity to interact during a “live” session facilitated in Wimba. Please feel to register for any or all weeks of the workshop series. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 4: Feedback & Interaction

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 4, Feedback and Interaction, we will focus on the importance of regular and substantive feedback and how to encourage multiple levels of interaction in the online classroom. There are separate registrations for each week of the workshop series. Please feel to register for any or all weeks of the workshop series. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 3: Aligning Objectives & Assessments

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 3, Aligning Objectives, Assignments, and Assessment, we will focus on the importance of deliberately aligning learning strategies to ensure that students have a cohesive experience in a virtual classroom. There are separate registrations for each of the five workshops in the series. Please feel to register for any or all workshops in the series. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 2: Building Your Online Syllabus

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 2, Planning Your Online Syllabus, we will discuss the significance of a detailed and thorough syllabus as a roadmap, learning contract, and schedule. There are separate registrations for each of the five workshops in the series. Please feel free to register for any or all workshops. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation available the week prior to course start.

How Do I: Course Reserves (Webinar)

Course Reserves are materials (books, journals, articles, videos, DVDs, etc.) which are set aside by faculty for the exclusive use of their students. In this session, you'll learn how to set up hard-copy and electronic reserves.

NOTE: This Webinar will be held online using the University's Web conferencing system, Centra. You will need access to the Internet, and a microphone if you want to speak. See Centra's technical requirements on our Centra Resources page.

Engaging Students with Web 2.0 Technologies (Online)

In this session, attendees will examine how popular instructional technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social software can enhance interaction between instructor, students, and course content - thereby increasing active participation, enhancing communication and collaboration, providing opportunities for active feedback, and making learning more engaging.

NOTE: This is a new online-only version of the workshop using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet (and a microphone if you want to speak during the session). See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Using Video in Your Course (Online)

Everywhere you look on the Internet these days, you can find video. So, it's no wonder that more and more faculty are looking into using video in their courses. In this workshop, we'll discuss why to use video and explore your options – whether you want to use existing videos or create your own.

NOTE: This is a new online-only version of the workshop using the University's Web conferencing system, Wimba. You will need access to the Internet (and a microphone if you want to speak during the session). See Wimba’s technical requirements on our Wimba Resources page.

Understanding and Managing Academic Plagiarism

Plagiarism has become a more obvious violation of academic integrity since the Internet. It is both easier to accomplish and easier to detect; it is also easier to argue against it. Learn how you can help reduce plagiarism in student work.

Designing and Grading Writing Assignments

Students often do not understand the relationship between the design and objectives of a writing assignment and the criteria used to grade it. This workshop will help teachers write project goals for students and create an assessment tool to show students whether they have accomplished those goals.

Planning for Next Semester: Not Making the Same Mistakes Twice

This is a good time in the semester to reflect on what we have done, what seemed to work, and what we know we could do better. This workshop will provide an opportunity to ask some questions that will help you become a more “critically reflective teacher.”

Designing and Facilitating Student Project Groups: Collaborative Writing

Students learn well when they work in small groups: they learn to collaborate, to handle conflict, to communicate, and to reach consensus.  This workshop will discuss ways to set up collaborative writing groups so your students can work successfully in groups to plan, write, and revise a document. We will discuss what kinds of writing projects are appropriate for group work and ways to assess the group’s performance.

Summative Assessment: Developing Essay Tests

Essay tests are excellent for measuring higher level thinking such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Writing clear essay questions that students understand and can respond to is a skill that must be developed.   This workshop will take you through a process for determining when essay questions are appropriate as an assessment. A process for developing clear essay questions will be presented.

 

Summative Assessment: Developing Objective Tests

Objective tests are widely used to assess student learning. While objective test items are useful for assessing the lower levels of knowledge, some types can be effective for measuring more complex learning outcomes. The objectives of the workshop are: to identify when objective test items are appropriate for measuring student learning and to develop skills for development of effective objective tests.

 

Designing and Facilitating Student Project Groups

Students learn well when they work in small groups: they learn to collaborate, to handle conflict, to communicate, and to reach consensus. In this workshop, you will learn some theories of how to set up student groups in your classes, how to design appropriate group projects, and how to evaluate both the project and the group process.

Fundamentals of College Teaching

Graduate Assistant Workshop

Most students enter graduate programs expecting to learn and change; some, however, do not realize that part of their learning will include teaching courses and labs for undergraduates both in their major and in general education courses.

So, when you (as a graduate student) are asked to teach or to take on some teaching responsibilities, you may have few strategies to help you succeed.

This workshop introduces you to basic teaching strategies: what pedagogies are available to you, what technologies can help you, what kinds of students will you have in your classroom, and how you can deal with matters of classroom discipline or civility. You will earn one hour of graduate credit for successfully completing this workshop.
The sessions will meet from 1:00-3:00 on these Friday afternoons:

  • February 11
  • February 18
  • February 25
  • March 18
  • March 25

In the past, the workshops have attracted students from many disciplines with a range of teaching experiences.

The workshops are co-facilitated by Dr. Meg Morgan from the Department of English and an affiliate with the Center for Teaching and Learning and Dr. Maria Yon from the College of Education, a faculty fellow for five years with the Center for Teaching and Learning. Together they have 80 years of teaching experience.

NOTE: This is also offered as a one-credit-hour course. If you would like to sign-up for this as a credit bearing course, through the normal course registration system, instead of a workshop, the course is  EDUC-6000-001. Or you may sign-up here for the non-credit version. So we have a proper count of attendees, please sign-up here or there, but NOT both.

Teaching Large Classes: Creating a Positive Classroom Environment

Large classes present particular issues and challenges.  These challenges can be minimized by setting up an environment where students feel safe and valued.  This workshop will focus on best practices for getting your students engaged in learning in an setting that can be daunting to both you and your students.

Next Steps in Large Course Redesign (Session for Redesign Grant Recipients)

This is a general meeting for all of the recipients of the Large Course Redesign Grant funding. We will discuss criteria for Round II proposals and general considerations necessary to achieve improvements in teaching and learning through the course redesign efforts. We will also discuss our plans for how CTL will facilitate course redesign planning efforts throughout the summer.

EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative: Blended Learning: The 21st-Century Learning Environment

Sessions will be held 12:00 PM to 5:30 PM on Wednesday, September 15, and from 12:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Thursday, September 16.

The goal of this EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) 2010 Online Fall Focus Session is to revisit the potential of blended learning instructional models, student learning outcomes, and successful implementation practices. The maturing of online learning practices and engagements has opened new possibilities for curriculum design, including both face-to-face and online learning opportunities. The ability to design a course that uniquely blends face-to-face and distributed interaction allows institutions to address learners’ specific needs and customize the learning environment rather than rely on a “one size fits all” approach.

During this two-day online event we will:

  • Revisit the status of blended learning today—what we’ve learned and how this instructional approach continues to evolve to support learning across many disciplines
  • Create a framework for the successful design and deployment of faculty development for blended learning
  • Explore successful implementations of blended learning across different types of institutions
  • Reflect on the potential for blended learning to promote critical thinking, student engagement, and success
  • Consider assessment strategies for blended learning, both at the course and program levels
  • Identify the role learning technologies—synchronous and asynchronous—can play in blended learning
  • Engage in dialogue with a community of professionals focused on how to design and deploy blended learning across the curriculum

Sessions will include interactions in an online seminar, Q&A with the presenters, and scenario-based discussion groups face-to-face here at UNC Charlotte.

 

What Is It Like to Teach in America? (Part II)

Based on positive feedback from the participants of the first brownbag session, we are glad to extend the session into Part II. This time, Dr. Charles Hutchison from College of Education, the author of Teaching in America: A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers and Their Employers, will facilitate the discussion on the approaches to resolve or alleviate issues international faculty members encounter as a professional community at UNC Charlotte.  To learn about Dr. Hutchison, view his website, http://education.uncc.edu/chutchis/.

Planning Your Online Course, Week 1: Best Practices

This is an online introductory workshop for faculty who are new to online teaching and learning. During week 1, Best Practices for Online Course Design, we will examine best practices of online teaching identified in the literature. There are separate registrations for each of the five workshops in the series. Please feel free to register for any or all workshops in the series. This online workshop is facilitated in Moodle with a pre-workshop orientation.

Invitation to the Participants of the 2009 Summer Institute on Large Lecture Classes

This brown bag session is intended to talk about how things are going with your teaching since you participated in the Summer Institute. Has your teaching changed in any way? Have your students changed in any way? Do you have any questions or recommendations regarding large classes? Take a moment to share your current status and converse with fellow faculty members.

What Is It Like to Teach in America?

This brownbag session is intended to discuss what it is like to teach in American universities. Take a moment to begin sharing your experiences and voice your professional development needs.

Dr. Charles Hutchison in College of Education, the author of Teaching in America: A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers and Their Employers, will give his insights on what it is like to teach in America as opening remarks. To learn about Dr. Hutchison, view his website, http://education.uncc.edu/chutchis/.

 

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Jim Lyons)

Problem Based Learning to Promote Critical Thinking,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Jim Lyons,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., March 26, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive roundtable session, where Jim Lyons will discuss how to use problem based learning in the classroom to engage students and to promote critical thinking.

“The educational experience is so much more than teaching. It’s about inspiring people to learn and is as much about my education as it is about the students’ education.”—Jim Lyons, 2009 BOA Award finalist

About Jim Lyons

During his 30 year career in educational leadership at UNC Charlotte, Lyons has taught more than different 15 courses, and he has contributed significantly to student scholarship, directing 26 doctoral dissertations (at UNC Charlotte and UNC Chapel Hill) and serving as an advisor for more than 125 master’s degree projects. His past students include 12 superintendents, 24 assistant superintendents, more than 600 school principals and five university faculty members. Beyond the classroom, he has offered professional development programs across the country, published extensive research and conducted a major study to inform large, urban districts on hiring of principals.

Problem-Based Learning presentation slides:

 

Using Video in Your Course

Everywhere you look on the Internet these days, you can find video. So, it's no wonder that more and more faculty are looking into using video in their courses. In this workshop, we'll discuss why to use video and explore your options – whether you want to use existing videos or create your own.

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series (Lori Van Wallendael)

A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Lori Van Wallendael,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., Feb. 26, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Lori Van Wallendael will discuss how we can make lectures exciting and engaging for all students. Classroom demonstrations are a hallmark of her courses, and she uses her background in theater to enhance her presentations. Her students and peers remark on how she keeps students actively engaged with many participatory classroom activities.

LoriOne student explained, "As we learned of all of the social, cultural, educational, familial, and historical forces which shaped psychology, we began to understand more about the world today and subjects such as biology, physics, and chemistry as well as literature and art. Dr. Van Wallendael took psychology beyond the walls of the classroom and far beyond our field. Our studies were truly multidisciplinary." 

About Lori Van Wallendael

Joining UNC Charlotte over 20 years ago, Lori Van Wallendael has undertaken an increasing number of responsibilities, from being the former director of the Women’s Studies Program to her current role as associate chair of the Psychology Department. She also leads the department honors program and has served as advisor to the Psychology Club and Psi Chi, the psychology honor society. Her scholarship and service also reflect her passion for teaching, as she has published instructional materials as well as articles on pedagogy.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

Faculty Spotlight: Engaging Students in the Classroom (Roundtable Hosted by Dr. Patrick Moyer)

Inspiring Students to Think Critically,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Patrick Moyer,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Finalist

Fri., Jan. 29, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive session, where Patrick Moyer will discuss how we can use students’ interests to generate critical thinking and deep learning.  Moyer will also address the important issue of how to assess critical thinking development, even in large classes, and he will discuss how our own passion for our content area leads to better student engagement.

photo

“The educational experience is so much more than teaching. It’s about inspiring people to learn and is as much about my education as it is about the students’ education.” – Patrick Moyer, 2009 BOA award finalist

About Patrick Moyer

A 14-year veteran of the Department of Physics & Optical Science, Patrick Moyer was one of the prestigious finalists for the 2009 recipient of the highest teaching honor bestowed by UNC Charlotte – the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence. Moyer developed a new general education course, “Sports and Physics,” which he teaches every semester to large classes. The course presents fundamental physics concepts as they apply to sports, with a heavy emphasis on critical thinking. He never tires of teaching the course, as each semester is excitingly different because of the students.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • February: Lori Van Wallendael (CLAS) - Effective Lecturing Techniques
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series

Engaging Students in the Classroom,
A Roundtable Discussion Hosted by Dr. Charlie Burnap,
2009 BOA Teaching Award Winner

Fri., Nov. 20, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Atkins 124

All faculty are invited to attend this interactive roundtable session, where Charlie Burnap will discuss topics ranging from high level goals down to the nitty-gritty of teaching and how we can encourage students to be active learners.

“While setting high standards is important, it is essential to realize that most courses include students with a wide range of backgrounds, interests, and talents. Consequently, it is important that high level goals be approached in small steps. Because mastery comes from the act of doing, students must be engaged in classroom activities and must attempt assigned work.”—Charlie Burnap, 2009 BOA award winner

About Charlie Burnap

A 27-year veteran of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at UNC Charlotte, Charlie Burnap was selected from a prestigious list of finalists as the 2009 recipient of the highest teaching honor bestowed by UNC Charlotte – the Bank of America Award for Teaching Excellence. In addition to classroom teaching and individual tutorials, Charlie has led teaching discussions in his Department and in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. He has served on panels for Summer Institutes and on the College Task Force on the Evaluation of Teaching. He was one of the original members of the American Association of Higher Education Peer Review Project and has chaired the CLAS Course and Curriculum Committee.

Next in the Faculty Spotlight: Bank of America Award Finalist Series
  • January: Patrick Moyer (CLAS) – Critical Thinking
  • February: Lori Van Wallendael (CLAS) - Effective Lecturing Techniques
  • March: James Lyons (COED) - Problem Based Learning

 

How to Continue Instruction When Everyone’s Got the Flu

There has been much talk these days about the H1N1 flu and the possibility of a disruption of the academic year. Have you thought about how you will continue teaching if you and your students cannot come to campus?

The Center for Teaching and Learning has posted a plan for instructional continuity in the event of an emergency or disaster that might close the University for an extended period of time. In this session, you will learn more about the continuity plan and how you can prepare yourself and your students for a disruption of instruction.

NOTE: This event is an online Webinar. You can attend from anywhere you have an Internet connection and a computer with speakers. A microphone is optional.

Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is an important element in all professional fields and academic disciplines. We often say to our students, "Think!" But what do we mean by thinking and how do we encourage it? The purpose of this workshop is to introduce you to the various types of critical thinking and demonstrate how to plan for it.

New Faculty Collaborative Forum/Pizza Party

New faculty are invited to join the Center for Teaching and Learning staff to ask questions and get to know each other as we have pizza together at the end of this busy week.  Food and drink will be provided by the Center.  Just bring your questions and your collaborative spirit.  (As with all our workshops, you must signup online to attend.)

Classroom Management for Graduate Teaching Assistants

To remove some of the mystery in your new role as a graduate teaching assistant, we have pulled together all kinds of useful and foundational information on various teaching topics, from planning what you are going to teach to how to deal with problem students to how to write on the board.  This session will include a panel of your peers and will revolve around your most pressing needs, so be prepared to participate.

Teaching Large Classes

Entry-level large classes have distinctive characteristics different from those of advanced-level small classes, and it can be challenging to teach large classes.  To ensure that students receive a high quality learning experience and you remain sane at the same time, this workshop will equip you with teaching techniques and tools to overcome challenges of large classes and engage students in learning activities.

Summative Assessment Approaches: Planning Ahead.

Summative assessment is a hugely important part of the teaching and learning process. Essay and objective tests, portfolios, papers, projects, performances…so much to choose from! This workshop will show you best practices for choosing various summative assessments and how they align with your course goals.

IT Access @ UNCC

This session will help guide you through the computing resources available to you at UNC Charlotte. Special attention will be paid to show how to access these resources from home, too, such as email, stored files, special applications, library resources, HR information, and more.

Last Day of Class

The last day of class is as important as most other class sessions of the semester. It is the day to highlight what students have learned, bring meaning to the experience, and celebrate their achievements.

Classroom Discussions: Fostering Social Learning

Classroom discussion can be one of the most rewarding teaching methods, since it can create a democratic learning environment, foster mutual respect, and increase learning. This seminar will equip you with strategies for immediate use in your classroom.

The New American Lecture: Active Lecturing

Lecturing is a useful instructional method, so would you like to learn how to make it even better? This practical and timely session will show you how to enhance student learning by equipping you with best practices in lecture techniques and will help you liven up your lectures.

Syllabus 101: Designing Your Course Syllabus for Maximum Effectiveness

Your course syllabus is one of the most important documents you create for your class. It serves as an agreement between you and your students about your goals for the course and your expectations for your students, plus it conveys a first--and lasting--impression with your students. This session will provide information about the important components of a syllabus, ways in which you can enhance your course syllabus, and strategies for using your syllabus as a learning tool.

This workshop counts towards the Essentials of Teaching and Learning Certificate.